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Calculate and interpret the mean and standard deviation of data and use these to compare data sets. Investigate the effect of individual data values including outliers, on the standard deviation(VCMSP372)

[/fusion_text][fusion_text]LO: To calculate Pearson’s Correlation (R) of a bivariate data set.
Know:

  • How to calculate the mean of a set of data
  • The definition of an outlier
  • How to square a number
  • How to find the square root of a number

Understand:
That calculating the standard deviation shows us how much the data differs from the average value of a set of data

Do:

  • I can calculate the standard deviation from a set of data
  • I can use the standard deviation to compare different sets of data
  • I can identify outliers and eliminate them to calculate the standard deviation of a set of data.

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Visual Representations

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Notes

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Pearson’s correlation coefficient is a measure of the strength of the linear relationship between two variables. Basically it tells me how strongly one variable is related to another variable.

Pearson’s correlation (r) ranges from -1 to 1. -1 indicates a perfect negative linear relationship, while +1 indicates a perfect positive linear relationship.

[/fusion_text][/one_half][fusion_text]Why do we use it?

  • Tells us how strongly things are related to each other.

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Formula for Calculating Pearson’s r

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Quick Steps:

  1. Mulitply both x and y values for each data pairing

  2. Find x squared of each data pairing

  3. Find y squared of each data pairing

  4. Find the summation of all x values, y values, xy values, x squared values and y squared values.

  5. Plug each of the values into the Pearson’s r formula above.

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Pearson’s Correlation Videos

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Practise Questions

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My Maths 10/10A

Exercise 10C pg. 495 Q. 1-13

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